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GOMO-led AGU Sessions Accepting Abstracts through July 29

GOMO-led AGU Sessions Accepting Abstracts through July 29

The American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting will take place online this year from December 7-11. GOMO Program Manager, Emily Smith, and Knauss fellows Cheyenne Stienbarger and Ann-Christine Zinkann are looking for abstracts for the sessions they will be leading. Abstracts will be accepted until July 29, 2020. Info on each session is below:
 
Sea Level Rise:
Although sea level rise is a global phenomenon, the impacts are local, and are happening now. Changes in sea level are impacting communities across the globe on an almost daily basis through increased erosion and subsidence, greater saltwater intrusion, more frequent “nuisance” flooding, and higher storm surge. Planning for, adapting to, and mitigating current and future sea level and its impacts has begun out of necessity in many threatened areas. This session discusses the information that is needed for such efforts, and identifies areas where improvements still need to be made. In particular, this session invites contributions on understanding and projecting regional sea level rise and variability and its impacts, accounting for and identifying changes in extreme events, and assessing the role of land motion in future coastal flooding. Other studies and possible products related to understanding, quantifying and projecting sea level rise on local and regional are also encouraged. The primary convener for this session is GOMO Program Manager, Emily Smith.
 
Sea Ice:
Arctic sea ice cover has dramatically declined over recent decades resulting in widespread ecosystem responses. Accurate prediction of Arctic sea-ice conditions including concentration, thickness, timing of retreat and advances, type, and quality are of high-priority for Arctic Indigenous communities and required for assessments regarding national security, natural resource management, and ecosystem dynamics. Changes in sea ice conditions have affected Indigenous coastal communities in a variety of ways including reducing travel and access to subsistence harvesting opportunities and increasingly exposing their coastlines and infrastructure to storm surge. This session aims to bridge the gap between scientific knowledge and local community information requirements by gaining insights into sea ice modeling needs and limitations, the implications of seasonal model projections and variability, and products and delivery modalities usable to communicate forecasting information to Indigenous communities. Other studies related to the understanding and forecasting of sea ice conditions and Indigenous community impacts are encouraged. GOMO Knauss Fellow, Ann-Christine Zinkann is the primary convener for this session. Muyin Wang of PMEL and Matthew Druckenmiller of the University of Colorado Boulder are collaborators.
 
Tropical Pacific:
The first session focused on the tropical Pacific seeks fundamental science that will inform the process studies envisioned by the Tropical Pacific Observing System (TPOS); discuss advances in modeling capabilities and relevant field campaign facilities for TPOS 2020; and/or highlight the use of TPOS data and prospective products for improved process understanding and model improvement.
 
The second session seeks presentations that highlight the application of technologies, including platforms, sensors, and novel analysis of existing observing techniques, both in situ and remote, with the potential to detect, monitor and attribute changes in the physical and biogeochemical systems of the tropical Pacific to our understanding of outstanding questions in tropical Pacific climate variability. Lead conveners for these sessions are Sandy Lucas (Climate Program Office) and GOMO Knauss Fellow, Cheyenne Stienbarger.
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